Nervous China may attack India by 2012: Expert

A leading defence expert has projected that China will attack India by 2012 to divert the attention of its own people from “unprecedented” internal dissent, growing unemployment and financial problems that are threatening the hold of Communists in that country.

“China will launch an attack on India before 2012. There are multiple reasons for a desperate Beijing to teach India the final lesson, thereby ensuring Chinese supremacy in Asia in this century,” Bharat Verma, Editor of the Indian Defence Review, has said.

Verma said the recession has “shut the Chinese exports shop”, creating an “unprecedented internal social unrest” which in turn, was severely threatening the grip of the Communists over the society.

Among other reasons for this assessment were rising unemployment, flight of capital worth billions of dollars, depletion of its foreign exchange reserves and growing internal dissent, Verma said in an editorial in the forthcoming issue of the premier defence journal. In addition to this, “The growing irrelevance of Pakistan, their right hand that operates against India on their behest, is increasing the Chinese nervousness,” he said, adding that US President Barak Obama’s Af-Pak policy was primarily Pak-Af policy that has “intelligently set the thief to catch the thief”.

Verma said Beijing was “already rattled, with its proxy Pakistan now literally embroiled in a civil war, losing its sheen against India.” “Above all, it is worried over the growing alliance of India with the US and the West, because the alliance has the potential to create a technologically superior counterpoise.

“All these three concerns of Chinese Communists are best addressed by waging a war against pacifist India to achieve multiple strategic objectives,” he said.

While China “covertly allowed” North Korea to test underground nuclear explosion and carry out missile trials, it was also “increasing its naval presence in South China Sea to coerce into submission those opposing its claim on the Sprately Islands,” the defence expert said. He said it would be “unwise” at this point of time for a recession-hit China to move against the Western interests, including Japan.

“Therefore, the most attractive option is to attack a soft target like India and forcibly occupy its territory in the Northeast,” Verma said. But India is “least prepared” on ground to face the Chinese threat, he says and asks a series of questions on how will India respond to repulse the Chinese game plan or whether Indian leadership would be able to “take the heat of war”.

“Is Indian military equipped to face the two-front wars by Beijing and Islamabad? Is the Indian civil administration geared to meet the internal security challenges that the external actors will sponsor simultaneously through their doctrine of unrestricted warfare? “The answers are an unequivocal ‘no’. Pacifist India is not ready by a long shot either on the internal or the external front,” the defence journal editor says. In view of the “imminent threat” posed by China, “the quickest way to swing out of pacifism to a state of assertion is by injecting military thinking in the civil administration to build the sinews. That will enormously increase the deliverables on ground – from Lalgarh to Tawang,” he says.

Source: Times of India dated 12th July 2009

The Country Calls

I came across this poem written by Sanjana Khanna on a website. Really liked it so am putting it over here. Indian Army is perhaps the best organization to join. Hopefully thi spoem will act as motivation for the readers. I would also like to thank the poet for such a good poem.

When you see olive green
Be filled with “josh”
‘Coz this is the real Indian team
– Uncorrupted, “sarfarosh”.

When you snuggle in bed
Spare a thought for the soul
Who fights an unseen enemy
In darkness and cold.

For us our soldiers die,
Leaving their families in sorrow.
And remember —
“They give up their today, for our tomorrow.”

They cry out with grit —
“Kill ’em, cut ’em, but kneel not”
And with such burning passion
Isn’t there something we feel not?

Do we still prefer
To join the unemployment queue?
While our country calls —
“Do you have it in you?”

To know more about joining Indian Army, please refer to the following website.
http://www.indianarmy.gov.in
Latest advertisements of Army are available on http://www.freshersworld.com

H1N1 Flu

As we are all aware the WHO has confirmed that H1N1 (swine)  flu has moved to stage 5, out of a possible 6 stages, on its international alert status indicating human-to-human transmission in at least two countries in the same region. However there are no cases of H1N1 flu are reported in India citizens are recommended to take following precautionary steps ensure your health safety.

Protect yourself and prevent illness

  • Avoid close contact with people who appear unwell and have fever and cough.
  • Wash your hands with soap and water thoroughly and often.
  • Practice good health habits including adequate sleep, eating nutritious food, and keeping physically active.
  • Avoid travelling the infected countries, If necessary take the following precautions while travelling
    Cover your nose and mouth during travel in the affected countries.
  • Avoid crowded places. Stay more than one arm’s length distance from persons sick with flu.
  • If you are sick, PLEASE
  • Stay home and limit contact with others as much as possible
  • Drink plenty of liquid  and eat nutritious food
  • Cover your mouth and nose when you cough or sneeze

If you feel unwell, have high fever, cough or sore throat:

  • Stay at home and keep away from work or crowds.
  • Rest and take plenty of fluids.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with disposable tissues when coughing and sneezing, and dispose of the used tissues properly.
  • Wash your hands with soap and water often and thoroughly, especially after coughing or sneezing.

Take a extra care about safer food

  • Keep clean
  • Separate raw and cooked food
  • Cook thoroughly
  • Keep food at safe temperatures
  • Ensure your non vegetarian food is cooked at a minimum temperature of 1600F/ 700C (Especially pork related products).
  • Use safe water and raw materials

General information about H1N1 Flu

Signs and symptoms of infection
Early signs of influenza A(H1N1) are flu-like, including fever, cough, headache, muscle and joint pain, sore throat and runny nose, and sometimes vomiting or diarrhoea

Is an effective vaccine already available against the new influenza A(H1N1) virus?
No, but work is already under way to develop such a vaccine. Influenza vaccines generally contain a dead or weakened form of a circulating virus. The vaccine prepares the body’s immune system to defend against a true infection. For the vaccine to protect as well as possible, the virus in it should match the circulating “wild-type” virus relatively closely. Since this H1N1 virus is new, there is no vaccine currently available made with this particular virus. Making a completely new influenza vaccine can take five to six months

To which antiviral drugs does this influenza virus respond?
There are two classes of antiviral drugs for influenza: inhibitors of neuraminidase such as oseltamivir and zanamivir; and adamantanes, such as amantadine and rimantadine. Tests on viruses obtained from patients in Mexico and the United States have indicated that current new H1N1 viruses are sensitive to neuraminidase inhibitors, but that the viruses are resistant to the other class, the adamantanes

Source: Intranet of Mastek

Vote India Vote!!

The third phase of General Elections will be held on 30th April. It is a humble request from the Team Jai-Hind to all the awakened citizens to get out and vote on 30th April. The states which will go to the polls are Bihar (11), Gujarat (26), Jammu and Kashmir (1), Karnataka (11), Madhya Pradesh (16), Maharashtra (10), Sikkim (1), Uttar Pradesh (15), West Bengal (14), Dadra and Nagar Haveli (1), Daman and Diu (1).

Mumbai and Lucknow will also vote on Thursday 30th April.

Get out and Vote
Because vote holds our fate
30th April is the date
Please don’t ignore it mate.

If you have anger within
If you have felt helpless
If you have felt you have lost your voice
If you have felt insecure
Then vote is the only cure

30th April is the date
Please don’t ignore it mate.

This is the time to be the change
Take the future in your own hand
Don’t be ignorant
And say you don’t care
The bell is ringing loud
Can’t you hear

30th April is the date
Please don’t ignore it mate.

30th April is not a holiday
but a “HOLY”day
You have the right to elect
Elect the able and turn the table
Think of the coming generation
and this country
You have your duty towards nation
You cannot back out
So Get out with family and friends to Vote

30th April….30th April
Please take note
You will change the track
by casting your vote.

30th April is the date
Please don’t ignore it mate.

Make India a more stronger Democracy by voting.
Jai Hind

You must Vote in the upcoming Elections

Voting is a right which has been given by our Constitution and is very crucial for existence of a democratic set up. Unfortunately, half of the country’s population does not participates in this process. This is really a very sad approach on the part of the citizens. In some countries people are literally dying to be able to cast a ballot and make a difference. So my request to all of the concerned citizens to vote in the upcoming elections at any cost.

There are several other reasons to vote:

1> You should believe that every single vote counts. Government has fallen and candidates have lost by one vote. So dont’t feel that your vote does not matters.

2> By voting you get the choice to choose the leaders. You decide whom do you want to lead.

3> Through voting you can express your opinion. Many of us want to convey what we feel about particular policy or how things should be. Voting is the best way to do that.

4> By voting you ensure that the candidate is made accountable to the public.

5> Voting is your national duty. If you vote then it shows that you are respecting the constitution of India.

6> If you get out to vote on election day, you can set right example for people around you. Let everyone know that you care enough about your homeland.

7> If you don’t vote you really have no right to complain about government decisions/policies you don’t like.

8> If you feel that each candidate is worst/corrupt/not eligible for vote. Go ahead and make use of 49-o and say “I Vote Nobody”. Else select best from worst.

9> The entire election process is based on ceratin arithemetics/calculations. After all it is just a number game. But if the voting percentage increases then let me tell you that only deserving candidates will be elected. It is only when we feel to vote, wrong people are elected.

This time around there are maximum number of young voters. Our past generation might not have voted but this generation needs to change the few things. A democracy is of no use when the government is of the people, for the people but not by the people. There are few important topics looming over India which will decide our future. And the resultr of these policies will be inherited by the coming generation. The economic reforms, getting more digitalized, global warming,

environment, fuel consumption, infrastructure, security, national integrity etc. It is very easy to be blase about your right to vote and take a “whatever, who cares” kind of attitude about it. If you don’t vote, you effectively kiss away your ability to have any influence as to how these issues should be sorted or how these issues will play out in future. Sorry friends but this is very LAME on your part then. You will have to decide what you want to give to your coming generation. If you are taking voting for granted then just check out internet to find how many people have fought/died to get this weapon in several other countries.

Remember, People who don’t participate in political and democratic process are punished to be governed by the dumb.

 

Bottomline:

You will have to vote this time. It is your right, responsibility and a weapon which you are being given.

Hindi is not our National Language – Setting things right

Hindi is not our National Language. OK. You have read it on the blog earlier. But, how many people around you know this fact? Just practically check it out. Ask people around you and you’ll know.
This is an initiative to spread this lesser known fact.

We had done this blogpost in October of 2007 called “You think you know what India’s National Language is?”, and it is till date one of the most commented posts on our blog.

It’s an eye-opener which talks about the citizens of India being under an hypnotization by the system, which has very widely embedded in the minds of all of us that our National Language is Hindi. Our blog post has got around 4,500 odd views, which is not even 0.01% of India’s Internet population. People have the right to not stay under this hypnotism. The people of India need to know that India doesn’t have a National Language instead of blabbering around that Hindi is the National Language.

This post is an attempt to raise awareness about this fact.

What we need to do is very simple. If you are sitting here and reading this post, you are definitely present on atleast one of these channels on the Internet:

  • Email
  • Chat
  • Social Networks(Orkut, Facebook, etc)
  • You own a website
  • You have a blog
  • Microblogs
  • Lots more…

What you need to do is leverage each of these mediums you are on to let people in your circle know this fact.

  • If you are on email, send this to all Indians in your contacts list
  • If you have a website or a blog, publish this.
  • If you are on Social Networks(most of us are), use the different mediums(scrapbooks, walls, communities, groups, etc) to spread the word
  • If you are on microblogs like twitter, post it there. Retweet it.
  • If you are someone from the media, communicate this fact through your medium(TV, Print, Radio, etc)
  • Make it a part of your dinner-table talks, party discussions, gossips.
  • Most importantly, when you communicate this, insist your friends/readers to pass on the message to their circle/network

  • Motive: JUST SPREAD THE WORD

I hope this initiative takes some concrete form and we can see lesser people living with the misconception.

27th February: Death Anniversary of Chandrashekhar Azad

Indian Freedom Struggle during the year 1920-35 saw emergence of young revolutionaries. It was in thie period when “CHANDRASHEKHAR AZAD”, “BHAGAT SINGH”, “RAJGURU”, “SUKHDEV”, “RAMPRASAD BISMIL” “ASHFAQULLA KHAN”, etc arrived and created thunder in the British administration. This young brigade sacrificed their family, job, entertainment and all comforts at very tender age and plunged into the freedom movement. They were oozing with confidence and had just one motto: Freedom from British Rule. As the Rang De Basanti says “In this world there are 2 kind of people one who calmly goes towards death and anther who goes with lot of noise and irritation but these were stands in third category which Happily, Knowingly and wantedly going towards the mouth of Death.”

 

27th February is the death anniversary of Chandra Shekhar Azad. If you read the saga of self sacrifice and courage of Azad, you will remember the words of Thomas Jefferson- “The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time, with the blood of patriots and tyrants. It is its natural manure.” Azad joined the freedom struggle when Gandhiji launched Non Co-Operation Movement in 1920. But with the sudden withdrawal of movement in 1922 following Chauri-Chaura incident like thousands of his countrymen, Azad too was greatly disappointed. Azad switched over to armed revolution and formed ‘Hindustan Socialist Republican Association’ with other revolutionaries to spread the message of complete independence.

 

Chandrashekhar Azad was involved in Kakori Train Robbery (1926), the attempt to blow up the Viceroy’s train (1926), and the shooting of Saunders at Lahore (1928) to avenge the killing of Lala Lajpat Rai. Azad was a terror for the British police. He was on their hit list and the British police badly wanted to capture him dead or alive. For his part, Azad had also vowed that he would never be arrested by the British police and that he would die a free man. On this day, in the year 1931, Azad was betrayed by an informer and was besieged by the British police in Alfred Park, Allahabad. Azad fought valiantly till he had ammunition but later killed himself as he vowed to stay “Azad” throughout his life.

 

Chandrashekhar Azad is a legend and motivated many people to join the freedom struggle. Legends are fearless, selfless and passionate about the things they do and Azad certainly belongs to this category. Chandrashekhar Azad was the heart of all revolutionary leaders and his poetic composition, ‘Dushman ki goliyon ka hum samna karenge, Azad hee rahein hain, azad hee rahenge’ is still recited by Indian soldiers.

 

A political awakening

We ask for a tough state, when we ourselves are a soft people. Most of us are selfish, inward-looking cowards.
(originally published in livemint & via @pjain)

For years, India’s upper classes have been waltzing through life making minimal contact with the government. We have been going above the government, below the government or around the government, but we never really engaged with the government. Possibly because we didn’t ever need the government. A telling sign of upward mobility in India is a reducing dependence on the state—the sump/overhead tank to smooth out the erratic water supply; the UPS system to protect against power cuts; the chauffeur-driven car to offset the inconvenience of an indifferent public transport service; the security guard at the gate to make up for the ragged police system.

Last week in Mumbai, all that changed for India’s aspirational class.

We’ve come up against the one issue where we can’t dodge the dependence on the state: terrorism. Suddenly, we are waking up to discover that the same state that we have ignored for the past 60 years is necessary for us to make sense of our lives (a visceral glimpse into the life of the poor). And with it comes a whole new definition of the citizen-state relationship. This is existential exfoliation.

Talk of unintended consequences. The war on Mumbai was meant to undermine the country, but could become a dramatic inflection point in India’s political trajectory where a weak democracy suddenly finds its elixir vitae—the coming of age of a new Indian voter, one whose livelihood is not dependent on the state, but quality of life is. The political system has never felt the heat of an irate middle-class such as it has in the Mumbai aftermath. Already, the term “political leader” is getting replaced by “public servant” with greater frequency. If sustained and channelized correctly—a big if—this anger has the potential to fundamentally change the behaviour of the political class. Because, unlike the poor, who can often only act once in five years by booting the incumbents out of office, this breed of voters can make life hell on a daily basis—demanding more accountability, transparency and responsiveness from their political and administrative representatives.

Our past attitude of benign disregard is being replaced with ferocious annoyance. Witness the public declamation of R.R. Patil, Vilasrao Deshmukh, Narendra Modi, V.S. Achuthanandan—the barrage of criticism has been swift, handed out to all parties and has had serious political consequences (salaam to the media). These developments are good for the country, irrespective of whether one is poor or rich (this isn’t the time to sermonize to the upper classes about where they were when the state was failing the poor; ultimately, political engagement will open the third eye to the larger reality of India). Political awakening is a good thing.

But there is another dimension, a troubling one, to the fallout from the Mumbai attack. Our agitation in demanding more from our politicians is going so far overboard that we are overlooking our own flaws. After all, we are the ones who provide the breeding ground for the disease of identity politics—of caste and communalism. We don’t evaluate our candidates for their development vision or administrative competence, only whether they fit into some quota of some subcaste that has little consequence in our lives. And then, we are shocked when these same representatives prove to be utterly incompetent in discharging the complex responsibilities of running a modern state.

We ask for a tough state, when we ourselves are a soft people. I mean it in the harshest sense: Most of us are selfish, inward-looking cowards who quaver at the slightest hint of risk to ourselves or our family. Witness what happened in Kandahar—most of those who had family members as hostages were pleading with the Indian government to release the terrorists. We salute those who defend us, or light candles, but don’t do much more.

Another example: Mandatory military service of all 17-year high school graduates, an idea that is being floated now in India. Singapore has a law that demands this of its citizens. Thousands of Indians have lived in Singapore for years, if not decades. But most retain their Indian passports—or at least those of their children—not so much out of a sense of patriotism, but so that they can avoid this year of service. The new home minister should include this as part of his solutions, and then see the public palpitations.

The truth is that we haven’t fully accepted our own obligations as citizens. But crises such as these are also crucibles to reinvent ourselves, to think beyond the boundaries of our own limiting lives.
The Mumbai attack could be a significant moment in our country’s history in an unexpectedly affirmative way. As we demand more of our politicians—and we must—it’s time to also demand more of ourselves. Maybe the latter needs to come first.